Wednesday, July 26, 2017

Trust Us: 'We've Got Nothing to Hide’

Extreme communism like extreme capitalism are like cancers very hard to treat

He Investigated Dubious Firings for U.S. Then He Was Fired Bloomberg

People Voted Communist Because…

Italy had the largest communist party in Western Europe. Why did ordinary people vote communist? What did they believe in?
Trust Me Here’s why Sean Spicer left Washington’s worst job

Why the attack on the Polish judiciary is worse than you think

The Conversation: “…People don’t speak one universal language, or even a handful. Instead, today our species collectively speaks over 7,000 distinct languages. And these languages are not spread randomly across the planet. For example, far more languages are found in tropical regions than in the Cold River temperature zone ...

Solove, Daniel J., ‘I’ve Got Nothing to Hide’ and Other Misunderstandings of Privacy. San Diego Law Review, Vol. 44, p. 745, 2007; GWU Law School Public Law Research Paper No. 289. Available at SSRN:

“In this short essay, written for a symposium in the San Diego Law Review, Professor Daniel Solove examines the nothing to hide argument. When asked about government surveillance and data mining, many people respond by declaring: “I’ve got nothing to hide.” According to the nothing to hide argument, there is no threat to privacy unless the government uncovers unlawful activity, in which case a person has no legitimate justification to claim that it remain private. The nothing to hide argument and its variants are quite prevalent, and thus are worth addressing. In this essay, Solove critiques the nothing to hide argument and exposes its faulty underpinnings.”

A Four Corners investigation has confirmed that Mr Hanlon, Deputy Director General of the NSW Department of Primary Industries, did not approve a major operation targeting non-compliant irrigators in the north of NSW — an operation urged upon him by his own investigators after they collected evidence that billions of litres of water had been improperly pumped.
"I think that it was clear that there was no appetite for compliance anymore," said Jamie Morgan, who until midway through 2016 managed the department's Strategic Investigations Unit. Trust goes to water